Savory Scones with I’itoi Onions

Wintertime is the time to turn on the oven and bake some yummy treats like these scones with a hint of onion.  It’s just a hint of onion because we are using I’itoi onions – a mild-flavored perennial onion that grows well in the Southwest winter season.  They retreat underground with the heat of summer. Where to Find I’itoi Onions I’itoi onions (pronounced “e-e-toy”) are shared around Southern Arizona by gardeners and afficianados. They are also sold through Native Seeds/SEARCH (NS/S). NS/S says that the ones they offer “resemble the […]

Savory Cinnamon – A Holiday Treat

Many of our holiday offerings include cinnamon. Cinnamon is traditionally used in winter cooking, like pumpkin pie, snickerdoodles, and gingerbread. Why cinnamon? The Botany of Cinnamon If you want to – skip this section and go to the recipe. But because I, Jacqueline Soule, am an ethnobotanist, and I am fascinated by human uses of plants, I present some of the interesting history of this spice. The word “cinnamon” is directly from Hebrew.  In the Old Testament “kinamon” is mentioned in the same context as the treasures of gold, silver, […]

Poppy Seed & Barrel Seed

This post goes live on November 11.  We honor veterans today and every day. The poppy is often used as a symbol of this day.  Last week on Gardening With Soule – Jacqueline discussed how to Grow Poppy Flowers. Since this is a food blog let’s look at the poppy seeds, and the easily harvested Southwestern alternative to them. Using The Whole Poppy Many cultures use poppy seed for food. In Europe bakers use poppy seed whole to decorate their products or milled and mixed with sugar as a sweet […]

Corn Season

Corn season is upon us and there are many great ways to enjoy this fruit. (Garden Geek reminds us that if it has seeds it’s a fruit.) Mexican Corn Each region of Mexico prepares corn slightly differently. Down in Chiapas, street vendors served their roasted ears of corn with a paper packet of some spice blend that included salt and oregano. The paper was quarter sheets of old newspapers. Move to the opposite end of Mexico, to Chihuahua, and the roasted street corn on the cob comes with a wedge […]

Use Herbs & Spices Carefully

A dear friend is in hospital today and may not make it. Not Covid-19 – some herbal tea served to him by a neighbor. He is on blood thinners for health reasons, and she served him a herbal tea rich in coumarin – a natural blood thinner. Tasty  Tea There are any number of tasty herbal teas. Some you can grow in your yard. Some you can harvest in the wilderness. Many you can simply buy in the supermarket! Just because it’s sold in the supermarket does NOT make it […]

Harvest Rosehip Delights

If you harvested your rose petals for rose drinks carefully this summer, there should be some rosehips ready for harvest right now. (Recipes for rose petals = Drink your Roses – here.) This is especially true for those readers at higher elevations in the Southwest or elsewhere in the USA. (Welcome new readers in Michigan and Colorado. Thanks for signing up!   Rosehips Abound The wild Western rose, also called Wood’s rose (Rosa woodsii) is found throughout the Southwest and has lovely rosehips to forage. Wild rugosa rose (Rosa rugosa) […]

Epazote – A Handy Herb that Loves Southwest Summers

Epazote is a summer growing herb that’s easy to grow and use. It is useful because it helps predigest the “gassy” bean compounds. What’s in the Name? Epazote is basically pronounced “eh-pa-zo-tee.” There. Now you know a word in Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs! * The name is the same in Nahutal, Spanish, and English. *Word-Nerd Note: If you can say Mazatlan, you are also speaking the Nahuatl name of the town, it translates to “deer place.” Epazote (formerly Chenopodium ambrosoides, now renamed Dysphania ambrosioides) is in the same […]

Savory Sunflowers – An All-American Treat

Sunflowers are an American native plant, used for centuries by the Native people. The plants once grew only in North and Central America (the “New World”). Once Europeans “discovered” sunflowers, they were rapidly carried and planted around the globe. Indeed, sunflowers are one of the plants that were part of the “Columbian Exchange” that we discussed earlier this year in our post about Strawberry Fennel Salad (here). Many Sunflowers to Choose From There are over 70 different species of sunflower (Helianthus). Best known is the garden sunflower (Helianthus annus) which […]