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Brittlebush – A Useful Southwest Plant

Brittlebush (Encelia farinosa) is one of the most common and conspicuous wildflowers of the Sonuthwest deserts; seasonally providing a glowing golden-yellow cloak. And yes, the wood is brittle, hence the name. I wrote about growing brittlebush on GardeningWithSoule (here) now lets look at how to use this lovely plant. Brittlebush Resins The resin of brittlebush collected from the base of the plant is often yellowish to brown in color. This resin can be heated and used as a glue. The O’odham and Seri used it for hafting, to hold points […]

Chicken Soup from the Soule

All this cold weather we’ve been having, some nice chicken soup is just what we need to warm us up! Jacqueline Soule here this week with an old Soule family recipe for chicken soup.. Old Soule Family Recipe My parents grew up during the Great Depression back in the 1930’s, followed by WWII and ration books for food. My grandmothers on both sides did the best they could to feed their families, often getting quite creative about meals. As a child, I would watch the meal preparation process with fascination […]

Beef is Best Done Low & Slow

An inexpensive cut of beef can be turned into a tender and tasty meal when you take time to cook it low and slow. Take Your Time to Make This Beef Uncle Smokey here to tell you about one of my favorite weekend recipes. It starts Friday morning before I head out to work – I take a chunk of beef (generally a London broil) out of the freezer to thaw. Friday evening I add a rub or marinade to the beef and let it sit overnight (in the fridge) […]

Chia Honey Pudding – Ancient Treat for Modern Diets

Did you resolve to eat better? Monica King is here today with a healthy paleo desert that is simple to make.  Best of all it uses the seeds of a Southwestern wildflower – chia.  This wonderfully light pudding that fits perfectly into low-carb, keto, gluten-free, paleo diet and is extremely versatile. Chia The key ingredient is chia seeds. These seeds are hydrophilic, they can absorb over ten times their weight when soaked in liquid and develop a mucilaginous coating that gives them a gelatin type texture. If you have never […]

Savory Scones with I’itoi Onions

Wintertime is the time to turn on the oven and bake some yummy treats like these scones with a hint of onion.  It’s just a hint of onion because we are using I’itoi onions – a mild-flavored perennial onion that grows well in the Southwest winter season.  They retreat underground with the heat of summer. Where to Find I’itoi Onions I’itoi onions (pronounced “e-e-toy”) are shared around Southern Arizona by gardeners and afficianados. They are also sold through Native Seeds/SEARCH (NS/S). NS/S says that the ones they offer “resemble the […]

Pecan Turtles

Do you have pecan trees?  Many people in the Southwest do.  Now how to use all those pecans while they are fresh and tasty?  Here is a recipe shared from a friend who lives north of the border – the other border! Janet Davis lives in Canada and makes these yummy “pecan turtles” for the holidays. Janet Davis, our guest author This creative lady is a garden writer like Savorist Jacqueline Soule.  Janet is also a photographer – and her words and images have been featured in numerous books, magazines, […]

Savory Cinnamon – A Holiday Treat

Many of our holiday offerings include cinnamon. Cinnamon is traditionally used in winter cooking, like pumpkin pie, snickerdoodles, and gingerbread. Why cinnamon? The Botany of Cinnamon If you want to – skip this section and go to the recipe. But because I, Jacqueline Soule, am an ethnobotanist, and I am fascinated by human uses of plants, I present some of the interesting history of this spice. The word “cinnamon” is directly from Hebrew.  In the Old Testament “kinamon” is mentioned in the same context as the treasures of gold, silver, […]